Posts Tagged ‘iPhone’

I can’t believe it’s not cocaine: iSnort for your iPhone

June 12, 2009

Who thinks of this stuff?

Download here.

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Turn your iPhone into a “flute”

January 6, 2009

Ocarina is an application for your iPhone that turns your phone into a “flute.”  Check out the video below to see play the Zelda theme.

Thanks to Izzy, via Wired

Mac vs. PC vs. Westside Story vs. gorefest

October 23, 2008

Wow.

Who cares that Google’s Android phone is on the horizon? Apparently not iPhone fanatics.

August 17, 2008

From Phandroid, a site for fans of Google’s mobile-web phone, Android.

When TechCrunch’s Erick Schonfeld suggests, “We have to talk about Android,” at the Mobile Web Wars Roundtable, some village’s idiot whined, “Why? Why do we have to talk about Android – nobody cares.” Then Michael Arrington popped a squat on his pitiful one man parade lecturing, “That’s ridiculous. That’s absolutely ridiculous. As soon as it launches you’re going to be kissing Google’s ass.”

Bluetooth Handgun handset for the iPhone

July 15, 2008

Instructables.com brings you a guide on how to turn your Bluetooth handset into a potentially disastrous modification.

How to turn an airsoft handgun and a bluetooth headset into a fun, fully functional handset for your iPhone. Pull the trigger to receive calls and to, um, end them. Listen through the barrel, and talk into the grip.

I think everyone has made the thumb and forefinger gun-to-the-head sign when someone unpleasant shows up on their caller ID. Eli and I thought it would be fun to make an actual gun handset, and it turned out to be surprisingly straightforward. No glue or powertools were required.

Even though it’s not very practical, there’s something so satisfying about ending a call with this handset. Pow.

Naturally, this handset works with any cell phone. You just feel like pulling the trigger more if you own an iPhone.

View all the steps necessary to get the cops to hassle you here.

Cop arrests man for (spins the wheel of made up laws)…”unlawful photography”

July 15, 2008

Nearly everyone carries a cell phone and it’s hard to find one without that camera feature.  It’s convenient when you want to take that impromptu photo, but a Tri-Cities area man ended up behind bars after snapping a shot of a Johnson County sheriff’s deputy during a traffic stop.

The cell phone photographer says the arrest was intimidation, but the deputy says he feared for his life.

“Here’s a guy who takes me out of the car and arrests me in front of my kids.  For what?  To take a picture of a police officer?” said Scott Conover.

A Johnson County sheriff’s deputy arrested Scott Conover for unlawful photography.

“He says you took a picture of me.  It’s illegal to take a picture of a law enforcement officer,” said Conover.

Conover took a picture of a sheriff’s deputy on the side of the road on a traffic stop.  Conover was stunned by the charge.

“This is a public highway,” said Conover.

And it was not a place where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy as Tennessee code states.  The deputy also asked Conover to delete the picture three times.

“He said if you don’t give it to me, you’re going to jail,” said Conover.

Under the advice of the Johnson County attorney, the sheriff would not comment and the arresting deputy said he didn’t want to incriminate himself by talking to us.

In an affidavit, the deputy said he saw something black with a red light which he thought was a threat.  Conover was also arrested for pointing a laser at a law enforcement officer.

“At no time did I have a laser.  I had an iPhone,” said Conover.

When you take a picture in the dark with Conover’s Apple iPhone, there is no flash or any light that comes from the phone that could be mistaken for a laser.

In a witness statement by a Mountain City officer, is says the deputy asked about the picture rather than looking for a laser.

“If you arrested me, wouldn’t you take the laser?  If you arrested me, wouldn’t you take the camera?” said Conover.

He expects these charges to be dismissed.

“This guy maliciously arrested me, charging me with phony charges that he don’t even understand himself,” Conover said.

The American Civil Liberties Union would not comment on Conover’s case without fully reviewing the allegations, but told us there is no law that prohibits anyone from taking photographs in public areas, even of police.  Taking photos is protected by the First Amendment.  Conover is ordered to appear in a Johnson County court on August 6th.

Source

A good resource utilized by photographers that gives an overview of a photographer’s rights can be found here.

Things that suck about the iPhone

June 9, 2008

This from an admitted iPhone fan…..

Preview of New Google “Android” cellphone

May 31, 2008

Ck. out the video below. It’s a bit dry but then you see the interface and features after about 60 seconds. Read more details here.