Posts Tagged ‘interview’

The most awkward band interview you’ll see today.

December 10, 2008

It starts off fair, and quickly heads south.  The band Killswitch Engage toys with the interviewer.

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Michael Bay talks about “Transformers 2” and “Friday the 13th” remake

July 17, 2008

Fresh off his all too funny self-parody in a Verizon commercial, Michael Bay talks shop. Specifically, Transformers 2 and his remake of Friday the 13th. Lord help us………be sure to read his comments about the funny blog posting of his Rejected Script for Batman: Dark Knight. I don’t think he gets it.

During a break on the set of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen — described to us as a “remote air force base” at an “undisclosed location” — horror franchise reviver and blockbuster director extraordinaire Michael Bay hopped on the phone to give us the scoop on the Transformers sequel, his other projects in the works, and his reaction to that Dark Knight script circling the Internet with his name on it…

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What can you tell us about Transformers 2? Or, better yet, what will you tell us?
MICHAEL BAY: When we were writing the script, I said to the writers, “I hate sequels that try to make it to the third movie. Pretend like we’re never having a third movie, so let’s go for broke on the second one. I hate those cliffhangers! Let’s just make this movie stand on its own.” I really feel this movie is not a forced sequel. I think the script is really good, and I think it’s got a lot of new stuff in it. There are a lot of rumors out there, but we’ve released a lot of fake stuff. We’ve done a really good job of keeping things secret.

Can you give us a hint of something that is true then?
[Laughs] No.

C’mon, anything?
There are some great, new robots that are really inventive.

You recently wrapped production on your update of Friday the 13th, and horror buffs out there are dying to know: what’s it going to be about?
It’s a reconception of the original. We’re introducing a whole group of new kids. What we always try to do is add a little bit of freshness to these movies that were really scary back then and update them for a new audience.

AFTER THE JUMP: Bay continues on Friday the 13th (“You’re just not going to believe the first 12 minutes!”) and talks Ouija boards.

So are you following the same plot as the very first Friday the 13th?
It’s a little different. I don’t want to give it away because of the Internet crazies.

There’s been rumors that you’re going to include plots from all three Friday the 13ths into your remake. Is that true?
The first two, yeah.

Where did you film the Crystal Lake scenes?
In Austin, where we also shot Texas Chainsaw. Austin gives you a lot of looks.

Is there anything else you are willing to divulge about it?
I haven’t seen the director’s cut because he’s still cutting, but I know this one will really be scary; it’s also funny, as well. It’s a fun college adventure that goes awry. It’s not a movie I would ever show my mom! (Laughs) We don’t make these for our mothers; we make these for the fans out there.

Speaking of those fans, what do you say to people who are worried that an update of Friday the 13th will ruin the original?
There are always haters out there, and you can’t get rid of that. We try to be faithful, and we’re fans ourselves. It’s like when I did Transformers — I listened to the fans, you know, but you still have to make your own movie by respecting what was done and trying to give it a whole new twist.

How have you given it a new twist?
You’re just not going to believe the first 12 minutes! It’s a twist in itself.

And you’re actually working on a remake of Nightmare on Elm Street, too, right?
Don’t know yet. We haven’t made our deal, but it’s worth every penny.

What are you working on next? Ouija?
It’s something we’re playing with, yes. I’m just producing it. As far as being a director, I’m not sure what I’m doing next.

What will Ouija even be about?
We’re just meeting with writers now. There’s a plot that I actually wrote the outline for; we’re just trying to get the script right.

Finally, I just have to ask, did you happen to see the “Michael Bay’s Rejected The Dark Knight Script floating around online?
[Laughs] That’s complete bulls—! I might’ve read one line of that.

Did you find it funny at all?
It’s just, where do people find all of this time?

John Lennon on Jesus-“I’m one of Christ’s biggest fans.”

July 14, 2008

(I know Jesus wasn’t European looking, so don’t bother getting riled up)

John Lennon, famous for singing, “Imagine there’s no heaven,” is now said to have been “on the side of Christ,” according to his own words recently unearthed from a long-lost radio interview.

“I’m one of Christ’s biggest fans,” the Beatles’ songwriter is heard to say in a 1969 interview with Ken Seymour of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. “And if I can turn the focus on the Beatles on to Christ’s message, then that’s what we’re here to do.”

The interview with startling words from a man long-considered to be hostile to Christianity was bought three years ago by National Museums Liverpool, a museum complex headquartered in Liverpool, England, the city of Lennon’s birth. According to the London Telegraph, the museum is playing an extract of the interview at its World Museum Liverpool venue.

Lennon drew international headlines for proclaiming in a March 4, 1966, interview in the London Evening Standard, “Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I do not know what will go first, rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. We’re more popular than Jesus now.”

In America, Lennon’s words sparked a fury of backlash from Christians, some of whom protested by burning Beatles records or blacklisting the group’s songs from radio stations. Ripples of the quote could be heard in a 1994 song by Christian singer Charlie Peacock, who sang, referring to Christianity’s expectation of Christ’s Second Coming, “The multitudes are waiting, waiting on pins and needles, for the one more famous than the Beatles.”

In the newly released interview, however, Lennon says his famous popularity quote was misunderstood. “It’s just an expression meaning the Beatles seem to me to have more influence over youth than Christ,” he said. “Now I wasn’t saying that was a good idea, ‘cos I’m one of Christ’s biggest fans.”

According to the Telegraph, Lennon’s words in the 1969 interview blame “hypocrites” for being too “uptight” in their reaction to his popularity boast.

In the newly released interview Lennon said, “If the Beatles get on the side of Christ, which they always were, and let people know that, then maybe the churches won’t be full, but there’ll be a lot of Christians dancing in the dance halls. Whatever they celebrate, God and Christ, I don’t think it matters as long as they’re aware of Him and His message.”

Two years after the interview, Lennon again released a song, “Imagine,” that drew the ire of churchgoers. The song contains the lyrics, “Imagine there’s no heaven; it’s easy if you try. … Nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too.”

Now, the recovered 1969 interview may shed some light on Lennon’s thoughts behind the famous song.

“I haven’t got any sort of dream of a physical heaven where there’s lots of chocolate and pretty women in nightgowns, playing harps,” he said. “I believe you can make heaven within your own mind. The kingdom of heaven is within you, Christ said, and I believe that.”

Lennon gave interviewer Ken Seymour some background on his aversion to institutional religion, telling the story of a vicar who banned him from church when he was 14 for “having the giggles.”

“I wasn’t convinced of the vicar’s sincerity anyway,” Lennon said. “But I knew it was the house of God. So I went along for that and the atmosphere always made me feel emotional and religious or whatever you call it.

“Being thrown out of the church for laughing was the end of the church for me.”

His frustration with the church apparently continued, when, just a few months before the interview he married artist Yoko Ono after divorcing his first wife.

“I would have liked to have been married in a church,” he said in the interview, “but they wouldn’t marry divorcees. … That’s pure hypocrisy.”

Lennon repeated the word “hypocrisy” several times in the interview, including it in his reason for avoiding church as a place of prayer. “Community praying is probably very powerful. … I’m just against the hypocrisy and the hat-wearing and the socializing and the tea parties,” he said.

Source

How to interview Gary Busey by Gary Busey

July 1, 2008

It’s odd..it’s bizarre….it’s Busey. Interviewer attempts to ask questions of Gary Busey for the project “Hunter S. Thompson on Film.”

Funny interview with the original TV Batman, Adam West

June 26, 2008

A small excerpt from a recent interview with Adam West, the original TV Batman.

Most men have fallen for the wrong type of woman at least once – did you have some sympathy for your character for his love of Catwoman?

Oh yes. He was just a poor soul. He was so torn, Martin…it was heartbreaking! [laughs] He had these curious stirrings in his utility belt, and yet he knew she had to be put away in the slammer.

Do you ever regret turning Cubby Broccoli down for James Bond in Diamonds Are Forever?

Not really. No, wait a minute. Yes.

Full interview at The Den of Geek.

And a scene from “The Batman Movie” made in 1966. Holy sardine!

The Abomination (Tim Roth) speaks about his role in the new “Incredible Hulk” film

June 15, 2008

I’m a big Tim Roth fan, especially of his work in Quentin Tarantino films. He gives a good interview discussing what it was like filming his first big-budget project.